missjessieparks

Jessie Parks

Words 'n Pictures
Iraqi Kurdistan

Frederick Douglass is an American hero of mine on multiple fronts–education being one of them. He was a self-taught runaway slave who secretly taught other slaves to read–making them fit to forge passes into free states, as the illiterate were vulnerable to capture.
.
Decades after Douglass' 1838 escape, he became one of the most prolific writers, orators, and intellectuals of his day, advising presidents and lecturing thousands both at home and as a diplomat. It was he who held the highest appointed public post in Washington. It was he who became the first African American citizen nominated for Vice Presidency. And it was he who was the most prominent abolitionist and civil rights advocate in American history.
.
His education was the means to his own freedom–and later, the freedom of 3 million enslaved people through his paramount role in Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.
.
That being said, I'm glad for this little school in Soran for refugees–the most vulnerable children in the region.
.
It is worth considering who among the children uprooted today by war are the next national leaders, thinkers, doctors, scientists, and great poets...the Frederick-Douglass-types. Perhaps it is they who are most equipped to lead and influence us all, not in spite of their current circumstance, but because of it.
.
“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” - Frederick Douglass
.
.
.
@therefugeinitiative #comminitesofhope

Frederick Douglass is an American hero of mine on multiple fronts–education being one of them. He was a self-taught runaway slave who secretly taught other slaves to read–making them fit to forge passes into free states, as the illiterate were vulnerable to capture. . Decades after Douglass' 1838 escape, he became one of the most prolific writers, orators, and intellectuals of his day, advising presidents and lecturing thousands both at home and as a diplomat. It was he who held the highest appointed public post in Washington. It was he who became the first African American citizen nominated for Vice Presidency. And it was he who was the most prominent abolitionist and civil rights advocate in American history. . His education was the means to his own freedom–and later, the freedom of 3 million enslaved people through his paramount role in Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. . That being said, I'm glad for this little school in Soran for refugees–the most vulnerable children in the region. . It is worth considering who among the children uprooted today by war are the next national leaders, thinkers, doctors, scientists, and great poets...the Frederick-Douglass-types. Perhaps it is they who are most equipped to lead and influence us all, not in spite of their current circumstance, but because of it. . “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” - Frederick Douglass . . . @therefugeinitiative #comminitesofhope - 18 hours ago

137 Likes
11 Comments
0
I so enjoyed shooting this piece for @guardian a few days before I headed to Iraq. Oh, how I love this quirky Georgia town brimming with refugees! And Katy Long absolutely nailed it with the writing--and she was such a pleasure to work with. Read it, folks! #onassignment
.
*Link on profile*
.
This small town in America's Deep South welcomes 1,500 refugees a year

I so enjoyed shooting this piece for @guardian a few days before I headed to Iraq. Oh, how I love this quirky Georgia town brimming with refugees! And Katy Long absolutely nailed it with the writing--and she was such a pleasure to work with. Read it, folks! #onassignment . *Link on profile* . This small town in America's Deep South welcomes 1,500 refugees a year - 2 days ago

88 Likes
9 Comments
1
Loading...
It was unusually cool and quiet, aside from the hum of the trucks and discussions about tying down the last box, bit, pot, or pan atop piles of pillows, baskets, and blankets ready to flap in the wind as the trucks went west. The little ones—scrubbed down and spruced up—were lively and ready, bunched in backseats beneath boxfuls of baggage with breakfast bread in hand.
.
Some of them hadn’t seen Mosul since August 2014 when they received a tipoff that ISIS was en route. They'd fled east to Soran—and made it out two hours shy of ISIS’s arrival.
.
They’re Shabak Kurds of the Shiite faith, and they had no place to go, no friends to fall back on, and certainly no confidence in what lie ahead.
.
So by September, Mayor Krmanj of Soran gave tents and land to The Refuge Initiative. It took one week to get a small camp up and running where these 20 families were given hope and refuge. They became part of something no one saw coming—not even The Refuge Initiative.
.
It was chapter one—the first of four small camps built by The Refuge Initiative. For two years, eight months, and 15 days or so, they lived in Soran. But just after 5 am yesterday, they headed back to Mosul.
.
To leave is to finally be going home and rightfully retrieving that which has been stolen. But it is also to realize utterly all that will never be given back; it is to say goodbye yet again and start anew. Everyone knew that yesterday—you could feel it in your gut and see it in their eyes. It seemed even the wind worried and hoped, worried and hoped.
.
So most everyone stayed busy. But others—well, they wept.
.
Yet it was right and good, and actually beautiful. They're finally home…where they ought to be.
.
.
.
@therefugeinitiative

It was unusually cool and quiet, aside from the hum of the trucks and discussions about tying down the last box, bit, pot, or pan atop piles of pillows, baskets, and blankets ready to flap in the wind as the trucks went west. The little ones—scrubbed down and spruced up—were lively and ready, bunched in backseats beneath boxfuls of baggage with breakfast bread in hand. . Some of them hadn’t seen Mosul since August 2014 when they received a tipoff that ISIS was en route. They'd fled east to Soran—and made it out two hours shy of ISIS’s arrival. . They’re Shabak Kurds of the Shiite faith, and they had no place to go, no friends to fall back on, and certainly no confidence in what lie ahead. . So by September, Mayor Krmanj of Soran gave tents and land to The Refuge Initiative. It took one week to get a small camp up and running where these 20 families were given hope and refuge. They became part of something no one saw coming—not even The Refuge Initiative. . It was chapter one—the first of four small camps built by The Refuge Initiative. For two years, eight months, and 15 days or so, they lived in Soran. But just after 5 am yesterday, they headed back to Mosul. . To leave is to finally be going home and rightfully retrieving that which has been stolen. But it is also to realize utterly all that will never be given back; it is to say goodbye yet again and start anew. Everyone knew that yesterday—you could feel it in your gut and see it in their eyes. It seemed even the wind worried and hoped, worried and hoped. . So most everyone stayed busy. But others—well, they wept. . Yet it was right and good, and actually beautiful. They're finally home…where they ought to be. . . . @therefugeinitiative - 3 days ago

191 Likes
4 Comments
1
She’s still quite a “looker”—every bit as much as I recall last I saw her. Forgive me (some of you) for not dropping a note sooner—you know who you are, and you know you are important to me.
.
I’ll tell you, yesterday @rescueiraq took a few of us up Bradost Mountain and then down into the Barzan Valley. Thankfully this afternoon the saffron haze of dust hanging cleared into sunny blue skies—but yesterday it made for quite a sight atop the mountain with the glinting river in the valley beneath. Don't ya think?
.
Anyhow, I'm happy to report that despite leaving ill, I somehow managed to make it across the ocean and a few seas uneventfully and, surprisingly, rather pleasantly. I suppose it was God’s own doing. Yes?
.
Well, blessings to all "behind me" here and now. Today I am well, and rested, and grateful—for this, and for you.
.
-J

She’s still quite a “looker”—every bit as much as I recall last I saw her. Forgive me (some of you) for not dropping a note sooner—you know who you are, and you know you are important to me. . I’ll tell you, yesterday @rescueiraq took a few of us up Bradost Mountain and then down into the Barzan Valley. Thankfully this afternoon the saffron haze of dust hanging cleared into sunny blue skies—but yesterday it made for quite a sight atop the mountain with the glinting river in the valley beneath. Don't ya think? . Anyhow, I'm happy to report that despite leaving ill, I somehow managed to make it across the ocean and a few seas uneventfully and, surprisingly, rather pleasantly. I suppose it was God’s own doing. Yes? . Well, blessings to all "behind me" here and now. Today I am well, and rested, and grateful—for this, and for you. . -J - 7 days ago

218 Likes
16 Comments
1
There is entirely to much to be said about the girl with fringed handlebars; but it’s more than worth your to read to know that those aren’t just any handlebars.
.
At one point Joanna had no fringes. Truth be told, she had no bike. For four whole years she and her brother had neither friends nor school. They had no freedom to go outside the apartment and play after she and her family fled to Turkey from Aleppo—they weren’t welcome there as Kurds from Syria.
.
None of that is true since they moved to Clarkston, Georgia a little over a year and a half ago.
.
All that to say, I have never met anyone more grateful for fringes...and for the way the wind blows through your hair when you peddle real fast or fly down a hill and just let go.
.
My goodness, isn’t that good?

There is entirely to much to be said about the girl with fringed handlebars; but it’s more than worth your to read to know that those aren’t just any handlebars. . At one point Joanna had no fringes. Truth be told, she had no bike. For four whole years she and her brother had neither friends nor school. They had no freedom to go outside the apartment and play after she and her family fled to Turkey from Aleppo—they weren’t welcome there as Kurds from Syria. . None of that is true since they moved to Clarkston, Georgia a little over a year and a half ago. . All that to say, I have never met anyone more grateful for fringes...and for the way the wind blows through your hair when you peddle real fast or fly down a hill and just let go. . My goodness, isn’t that good? - 26 days ago

158 Likes
6 Comments
0
#Repost @viewfind ・・・
Follow @missjessieparks | A Truly American Friendship
.
The hardliners of our political landscape today leave many imagining that a mythical influx of refugees from the war-torn Middle East will flood the United States and introduce critical consequences. How can they possibly integrate? What dangers do they pose?
.
Atlanta-based photojournalist Jessie Parks challenges that tired stereotype by exploring how a burgeoning friendship between two families — one Syrian, the other American — reminds us of America’s defining characteristics: openness, diversity and a stubbornly persistent desire to improve.
.
#enrich #culture #friendship #religion #refugee

#Repost @viewfind ・・・ Follow @missjessieparks | A Truly American Friendship . The hardliners of our political landscape today leave many imagining that a mythical influx of refugees from the war-torn Middle East will flood the United States and introduce critical consequences. How can they possibly integrate? What dangers do they pose? . Atlanta-based photojournalist Jessie Parks challenges that tired stereotype by exploring how a burgeoning friendship between two families — one Syrian, the other American — reminds us of America’s defining characteristics: openness, diversity and a stubbornly persistent desire to improve. . #enrich #culture #friendship #religion #refugee - 1 month ago

119 Likes
5 Comments
2
Just wanted the IG peoples to know that this sweet baby boy was born this week--and I'm one proud aunt! Maverick Glenn, a whopping 10lbs, 20.5", came Tuesday, April 11th.

WHAT A GIFT--love him so! 💛👶🏼 #mavvyg #babyboy

Just wanted the IG peoples to know that this sweet baby boy was born this week--and I'm one proud aunt! Maverick Glenn, a whopping 10lbs, 20.5", came Tuesday, April 11th. WHAT A GIFT--love him so! 🏼 #mavvyg #babyboy - 1 month ago

221 Likes
17 Comments
2
In the summer of 2015 John moved to Clarkson, Georgia from Aleppo—Madelyn moved from south Georgia. From strangers to neighbors, to homework help and grocery runs—the two families became dear friends.
.
I had the privilege (to say the least) of spending a few weeks getting to know them and photographing their friendship.
.
And, oh, how sweet it is.
.
This, ladies and gentlemen, is #America at her ✨finest.✨

In the summer of 2015 John moved to Clarkson, Georgia from Aleppo—Madelyn moved from south Georgia. From strangers to neighbors, to homework help and grocery runs—the two families became dear friends. . I had the privilege (to say the least) of spending a few weeks getting to know them and photographing their friendship. . And, oh, how sweet it is. . This, ladies and gentlemen, is #America at her finest. - 2 months ago

179 Likes
6 Comments
1
Lalish is the holy heartland of the Yazidi people, tucked in the valleys of the Nineveh Province of Iraqi Kurdistan. The nice folks there walk around shoeless, kissin' door frames, walls, and the ground here and there. They never step on, but always over, the thresholds of all the temple doorways—and asked that we do the same.
.

This was inside the Lalish temple. The ‘stached gentleman looking my way works for Baba Sheikh—the spiritual leader of the Yazidi people, akin to the Catholic's Pope.
.
"Stache" didn't speak much English, but stayed within spittin’ distance—watchfully somber and, I guess, curious about us and the boo-coos of photos I was taking.
.
The temple was dark and difficult to photograph. So as soon as I spotted the glory of God’s daylight bathing an opening in the wall, I pranced my little ambitious tail over to it and confidently planted not one—but two—bare feet right atop the doorway's threshold; a threshold that, perhaps, not a single soul had tread upon in a thousand years or so.
.
Smooth, Jessie. Smooth.
.
About the time the camera met my eye, ‘Stache (and everyone else) started hollering some Kurmanji-something about gettin’ my damnable feet the heck off that holy ground. I flailed in fear like a fish on a hook. What a terrible thing I had done!
.
After gaining composure, I glanced at “Stache”—certain an arrest was soon to follow. But, I kid you not, he stood there chuckling!
.

From then on he was astoundingly more approachable. He even came over and suggested I get a photo of myself, and offered his services. How very thoughtful! I eagerly handed off my camera...hoping it might atone for my “little” doorway mishap.
.
Anyway, I'm still terribly sorry for what I did. But, ya know, maybe seeing me misstep and make a fool of myself was wonderfully ordinary; thus, wonderfully kindred—wonderfully human. Which, perhaps, then made me wonderfully approachable—a thing of grace more effective than my most perfectly penned words or planned presentations.
.
Maybe we all need a little more brazen honesty about our missteps, for others—and for ourselves (if we're honest). Don't ya think?

Lalish is the holy heartland of the Yazidi people, tucked in the valleys of the Nineveh Province of Iraqi Kurdistan. The nice folks there walk around shoeless, kissin' door frames, walls, and the ground here and there. They never step on, but always over, the thresholds of all the temple doorways—and asked that we do the same. . This was inside the Lalish temple. The ‘stached gentleman looking my way works for Baba Sheikh—the spiritual leader of the Yazidi people, akin to the Catholic's Pope. . "Stache" didn't speak much English, but stayed within spittin’ distance—watchfully somber and, I guess, curious about us and the boo-coos of photos I was taking. . The temple was dark and difficult to photograph. So as soon as I spotted the glory of God’s daylight bathing an opening in the wall, I pranced my little ambitious tail over to it and confidently planted not one—but two—bare feet right atop the doorway's threshold; a threshold that, perhaps, not a single soul had tread upon in a thousand years or so. . Smooth, Jessie. Smooth. . About the time the camera met my eye, ‘Stache (and everyone else) started hollering some Kurmanji-something about gettin’ my damnable feet the heck off that holy ground. I flailed in fear like a fish on a hook. What a terrible thing I had done! . After gaining composure, I glanced at “Stache”—certain an arrest was soon to follow. But, I kid you not, he stood there chuckling! . From then on he was astoundingly more approachable. He even came over and suggested I get a photo of myself, and offered his services. How very thoughtful! I eagerly handed off my camera...hoping it might atone for my “little” doorway mishap. . Anyway, I'm still terribly sorry for what I did. But, ya know, maybe seeing me misstep and make a fool of myself was wonderfully ordinary; thus, wonderfully kindred—wonderfully human. Which, perhaps, then made me wonderfully approachable—a thing of grace more effective than my most perfectly penned words or planned presentations. . Maybe we all need a little more brazen honesty about our missteps, for others—and for ourselves (if we're honest). Don't ya think? - 2 months ago

239 Likes
11 Comments
0
Tim and Billy's friend, @wreya_omer, handed me his iPhone with an English instructional video on the ins and outs of prayer: what time it should begin and what one ought to be thinking (or not thinking) about when it does; to remember where to focus the eyes, put the hands, and place the feet; when to bend the body and the angle it ought to be bent at; and, of course, to double check a compass and be sure one’s aimed at Mecca. Details, details, details.
.
I was impressed.
.
I thought if I ever gave it a whirl, God would surely be blown away!—not because of my flawless execution, but because of utter disappointment. And told Wreya that God might not ever hear the prayers of ol’ clumsy and forgetful me! He laughed.
.
Then his sister whisked me upstairs to her closet after the Maghrib sunset prayer here in the backyard. She carefully sorted out a suitable dress color for my complexion and pinned my hair up at her vanity into a tall bun beneath a hijab. It felt more like childhood dress up to me—but she and the other girls beamed and said wide-eyed that I looked better than I ever had before.
.
I laughed because, honestly, I felt sillier than ever had before.
.
Then Wreya drove me and his sister to the mosque so I could take photos of Isha prayer after dark.
.
(May 2016)

Tim and Billy's friend, @wreya_omer , handed me his iPhone with an English instructional video on the ins and outs of prayer: what time it should begin and what one ought to be thinking (or not thinking) about when it does; to remember where to focus the eyes, put the hands, and place the feet; when to bend the body and the angle it ought to be bent at; and, of course, to double check a compass and be sure one’s aimed at Mecca. Details, details, details. . I was impressed. . I thought if I ever gave it a whirl, God would surely be blown away!—not because of my flawless execution, but because of utter disappointment. And told Wreya that God might not ever hear the prayers of ol’ clumsy and forgetful me! He laughed. . Then his sister whisked me upstairs to her closet after the Maghrib sunset prayer here in the backyard. She carefully sorted out a suitable dress color for my complexion and pinned my hair up at her vanity into a tall bun beneath a hijab. It felt more like childhood dress up to me—but she and the other girls beamed and said wide-eyed that I looked better than I ever had before. . I laughed because, honestly, I felt sillier than ever had before. . Then Wreya drove me and his sister to the mosque so I could take photos of Isha prayer after dark. . (May 2016) - 3 months ago

161 Likes
9 Comments
3
Joanna is a Syrian Kurd—been here about 19 months. And those American girls on either side of her are Maddie and Hannah, her two best friends. In recent weeks I've gone to ballet lessons, impromptu bike rides, and Stone Mountain park with them. I’ve heard the stories of their families over countless cups of strong black tea—and made it hopelessly impossible for myself not to love them dearly. I’ve been documenting their wonderfully uncommon friendship with my camera, and regularly adding to the bottom of a seemingly interminable Word document.
.
I haven’t a clue where it will all end up, nor do I much care. I just know it needs to be done—if only to teach me what I’ve yet to learn.
.
But if I may, can I share this bit from a recorded conversation last week with Joanna’s mom, Araz? And if it suits you, would you mind doing as she asks?
.
"Good gracious, the world is not right," I said after she relived their escape from Aleppo to Istanbul, "It’s not right that we get to live here in so much….Most Americans...they don’t understand—I don’t even understand what you have seen with your eyes… And...in America you can go your whole day and not think or know anything about what’s going on in Syria, ya know? Everything is blue skies and fine… [But] you—you have seen what [you ran] from." She nodded to agree, so I asked, "If you could say something to Americans…what would you say to them? What would you say they can do?"
.
She looked at me as if it shouldn’t have been a question and replied confidently, “Pray."

Joanna is a Syrian Kurd—been here about 19 months. And those American girls on either side of her are Maddie and Hannah, her two best friends. In recent weeks I've gone to ballet lessons, impromptu bike rides, and Stone Mountain park with them. I’ve heard the stories of their families over countless cups of strong black tea—and made it hopelessly impossible for myself not to love them dearly. I’ve been documenting their wonderfully uncommon friendship with my camera, and regularly adding to the bottom of a seemingly interminable Word document. . I haven’t a clue where it will all end up, nor do I much care. I just know it needs to be done—if only to teach me what I’ve yet to learn. . But if I may, can I share this bit from a recorded conversation last week with Joanna’s mom, Araz? And if it suits you, would you mind doing as she asks? . "Good gracious, the world is not right," I said after she relived their escape from Aleppo to Istanbul, "It’s not right that we get to live here in so much….Most Americans...they don’t understand—I don’t even understand what you have seen with your eyes… And...in America you can go your whole day and not think or know anything about what’s going on in Syria, ya know? Everything is blue skies and fine… [But] you—you have seen what [you ran] from." She nodded to agree, so I asked, "If you could say something to Americans…what would you say to them? What would you say they can do?" . She looked at me as if it shouldn’t have been a question and replied confidently, “Pray." - 3 months ago

188 Likes
10 Comments
0
Dear friends, not to by any means make light of Friday's political happenings and your reasonable conclusion on one side or the other, or to curtail your righteous anger or proud "whoo-rah" for the prez...
.
But could it be that maybe—just maybe—the recent "upheaval" is a necessary (perhaps, then, GOOD—can I say that??) fire under all our hind ends to take action? And I don’t just mean action like powerful poster protests, social media weigh in's, or healthy debates around the kitchen table—but to do what has been your responsibility all along? Perhaps channel all that passion and time given to participate and drive to and from public demonstrations or debates to instead go and care for the sojourners TODAY: feed them, invite them in, *listen* to them, clothe them, and look after them. Imagine how different the world would be if each of us—YOU—did all you're able with your five loaves and two fish.
.
#Atlanta, message me. I can connect you to plenty of refugees who are feeling very vulnerable and fearful in the wake of all this—they need you. Please make them the priority. (Also, odds are they’ll feed YOU a FEAST! Ha!)
.

If you're not in Atlanta, see link in my profile for a list of refugee aid organizations possibly near you.
.
@natebramsen said it beautifully:
"Do we actually care more about refugees (and each other) or just about making a raucous?
.
If you are aching, as I am, GO TO THEM!...
.
Hundreds of refugees STILL come into the USA daily. When was the last time you invited a refugee INTO your home for a home-cooked meal? How many refugees' phone numbers do you have in your contacts? How much does YOUR lifestyle CHANGE because you ache for refugees to be well cared for and compassionately loved? When did you last offer to tutor a refugee in English?
.
Have we become a nation where carrying a sign is noble, but caring for your neighbor is virtually unheard of? What changes opinions more effectively? Protests insulting leadership or people demonstrating sacrificial love? Are we ready to live loud lives of love?
.
Change doesn't start in the White House. It starts in my house."

Dear friends, not to by any means make light of Friday's political happenings and your reasonable conclusion on one side or the other, or to curtail your righteous anger or proud "whoo-rah" for the prez... . But could it be that maybe—just maybe—the recent "upheaval" is a necessary (perhaps, then, GOOD—can I say that??) fire under all our hind ends to take action? And I don’t just mean action like powerful poster protests, social media weigh in's, or healthy debates around the kitchen table—but to do what has been your responsibility all along? Perhaps channel all that passion and time given to participate and drive to and from public demonstrations or debates to instead go and care for the sojourners TODAY: feed them, invite them in, *listen* to them, clothe them, and look after them. Imagine how different the world would be if each of us—YOU—did all you're able with your five loaves and two fish. . #Atlanta , message me. I can connect you to plenty of refugees who are feeling very vulnerable and fearful in the wake of all this—they need you. Please make them the priority. (Also, odds are they’ll feed YOU a FEAST! Ha!) . If you're not in Atlanta, see link in my profile for a list of refugee aid organizations possibly near you. . @natebramsen said it beautifully: "Do we actually care more about refugees (and each other) or just about making a raucous? . If you are aching, as I am, GO TO THEM!... . Hundreds of refugees STILL come into the USA daily. When was the last time you invited a refugee INTO your home for a home-cooked meal? How many refugees' phone numbers do you have in your contacts? How much does YOUR lifestyle CHANGE because you ache for refugees to be well cared for and compassionately loved? When did you last offer to tutor a refugee in English? . Have we become a nation where carrying a sign is noble, but caring for your neighbor is virtually unheard of? What changes opinions more effectively? Protests insulting leadership or people demonstrating sacrificial love? Are we ready to live loud lives of love? . Change doesn't start in the White House. It starts in my house." - 4 months ago

199 Likes
11 Comments
3
Yesterday on International Holocaust Remembrance Day President #Trump signed an executive memorandum in an effort to grant Christian refugees and others from minority religions priority over Muslim refugees entering the United States by temporarily banning the entry of ALL Libyans, Somalians, Yemenis, Sudanese, Iraqis, and Iranis—even families on airplanes en route to America while the order was being signed. Further, Syrians were singled out as, "detrimental to the interests of the United States," and blocked from entry indefinitely.
.
That is a sizable portion of a region far too many brethren before us have assiduously pleaded before God to open doors to, that they might share together with those people that which we cannot lose. And today they are coming to us in droves! Yet we have instead sought to keep safe for ourselves that which we will all one day lose—and close the doors.
.
I am with you, #America; I want to be wise and keep my family safe. But this? This?
.
Dear me, our brothers and sisters are surely rolling in their graves.
.
.
.
.
.
.
#wewelcomerefugees #refugeecrisis #kurdistan #iraqikurdistan #everydaymiddleeast #everydayiraq #soran #refugeecrisis #documentary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #reportagespotlight #yourshotphotographer #lensculture #natgeo #refugees

Yesterday on International Holocaust Remembrance Day President #Trump signed an executive memorandum in an effort to grant Christian refugees and others from minority religions priority over Muslim refugees entering the United States by temporarily banning the entry of ALL Libyans, Somalians, Yemenis, Sudanese, Iraqis, and Iranis—even families on airplanes en route to America while the order was being signed. Further, Syrians were singled out as, "detrimental to the interests of the United States," and blocked from entry indefinitely. . That is a sizable portion of a region far too many brethren before us have assiduously pleaded before God to open doors to, that they might share together with those people that which we cannot lose. And today they are coming to us in droves! Yet we have instead sought to keep safe for ourselves that which we will all one day lose—and close the doors. . I am with you, #America ; I want to be wise and keep my family safe. But this? This? . Dear me, our brothers and sisters are surely rolling in their graves. . . . . . . #wewelcomerefugees #refugeecrisis #kurdistan #iraqikurdistan #everydaymiddleeast #everydayiraq #soran #refugeecrisis #documentary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #reportagespotlight #yourshotphotographer #lensculture #natgeo #refugees - 4 months ago

224 Likes
12 Comments
3
ATLANTA! If you're a photographer, love photography, or just sad and lonely--come to #ATLPhotoNight tonight at 7p.
.
I'll be sharing some work and would love to see you!
.

We'll be at @citizen.supply at @poncecitymarket savin' you a seat.
.
.
.
.
.
.
 #atlphotonight #kurdistan #iraqikurdistan #everydaymiddleeast #everydayiraq #soran #documentary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #reportagespotlight #yourshotphotographer #lensculture #natgeo

ATLANTA! If you're a photographer, love photography, or just sad and lonely--come to #ATLPhotoNight tonight at 7p. . I'll be sharing some work and would love to see you! . We'll be at @citizen.supply at @poncecitymarket savin' you a seat. . . . . . . #atlphotonight #kurdistan #iraqikurdistan #everydaymiddleeast #everydayiraq #soran #documentary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #reportagespotlight #yourshotphotographer #lensculture #natgeo - 4 months ago

263 Likes
15 Comments
0
I’ve been listening this afternoon to the long chat my friend Mary Beacom and I had with the elder woman on the left back in May 2016. I’m working to write her story down, and plan to share some of it with you all. Forgive me for not doing it sooner. I just want to do it right—for her.
.
Her name is Gawaré. She is a Yazidi woman living at the Rwanduz refugee camp built by @therefugeinitiative.
.
I hope to see her soon.
.
.
.
.
.
.
#lalish #yazidi #sinjar #kurdistan #iraqikurdistan #everydaymiddleeast #everydayiraq #soran #refugeecrisis #documentary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #reportagespotlight #yourshotphotographer #lensculture #natgeo #theglobewanderer

I’ve been listening this afternoon to the long chat my friend Mary Beacom and I had with the elder woman on the left back in May 2016. I’m working to write her story down, and plan to share some of it with you all. Forgive me for not doing it sooner. I just want to do it right—for her. . Her name is Gawaré. She is a Yazidi woman living at the Rwanduz refugee camp built by @therefugeinitiative. . I hope to see her soon. . . . . . . #lalish #yazidi #sinjar #kurdistan #iraqikurdistan #everydaymiddleeast #everydayiraq #soran #refugeecrisis #documentary #burnmagazine #photojournalism #reportagespotlight #yourshotphotographer #lensculture #natgeo #theglobewanderer - 5 months ago

338 Likes
15 Comments
3
"I’m going to make everything around me beautiful—that will be my life."
-Elsie De Wolfe
.
Yes—for this year and all ones I'm given thereafter. Happiest of New Years to you and yours. xx

"I’m going to make everything around me beautiful—that will be my life." -Elsie De Wolfe . Yes—for this year and all ones I'm given thereafter. Happiest of New Years to you and yours. xx - 5 months ago

183 Likes
11 Comments
0
"It is said of God that no one can behold his face and live. I always thought this meant that no one could see his splendor and live. A friend said perhaps it meant that no one could see his sorrow and live. Or perhaps his sorrow is splendor.”
.
-Nicholas Wolterstorff
.
(Photo from May 2016, Rwanduz Yazidi refugee camp built by the @therefugeinitiative)

"It is said of God that no one can behold his face and live. I always thought this meant that no one could see his splendor and live. A friend said perhaps it meant that no one could see his sorrow and live. Or perhaps his sorrow is splendor.” . -Nicholas Wolterstorff . (Photo from May 2016, Rwanduz Yazidi refugee camp built by the @therefugeinitiative ) - 5 months ago

217 Likes
4 Comments
3
On Refugees: More Than Escape
.

Wrote a new blog post on World Orphans site. #Repost @worldorphans with @repostapp
・・・
"Nothing seemed to bring about more rage in her than finding him with a newspaper; she’d rush at him in fury and snatch it from his hands." {Continue Reading: Link in Profile} #iraq #refugees #education #brightfutures #hope @therefugeinitiative, @hearthecry

On Refugees: More Than Escape . Wrote a new blog post on World Orphans site. #Repost @worldorphans with @repostapp ・・・ "Nothing seemed to bring about more rage in her than finding him with a newspaper; she’d rush at him in fury and snatch it from his hands." {Continue Reading: Link in Profile} #iraq #refugees #education #brightfutures #hope @therefugeinitiative , @hearthecry - 5 months ago

125 Likes
3 Comments
3
Load more posts
2017 - © Deskgram. All rights reserved.